Tag Archives: pro sports

Ray Rice, Roger Goodell, Lyotard and the power of discourse

This week for those follow the sports world there has been much ado about the video that has recently surfaced about Ray Rice concerning his assault cause on his then fiancé ( current spouse) Janay Palmer. While the details of the video are indeed graphic one does not need to see it to imagine what happened to Janay Palmer in the video. However, judging from its constant replay from various media outlets it would seem that the video completely changed the situation. Whether it is players who have now openly condemned Ray Rice and his actions or NFL who has suspended Ray Rice indefinitely for his actions it would appear that video evidence has changed everything. Examining the way video evidence has effect public perception of both Ray Rice and his actions reminds me of the Jean-Francois Lyotard’s writing on figurative discourse.

Lytorad in his early writing states “What is important in a text is not what it means but what it does and incites to do.” (Lyotard 1984b: pp. 9-10). For Lytorard what a text does is to transmit a message that has a certain effect on the recipients. Furthermore, a text incites transforms energy into other texts such as paintings, photographs, film sequences, political action, decisions, erotic inspiration, and even acts of insubordination. In this way text can broadly be conceived as particular story that is being told through a narrative in discourse. Thus according to Lyotard the video evidence of Ray Rice’s assault also serves as a form of text. When examining this text though we can see what it has done and what it has incited us to do. For starters this text has portrayed a different picture about domestic violence. As many people from various media outlets have already noted domestic violence is not pretty, it presents the very worst in humanity. Video imagery of this has caused many people to no longer leave the portrait of domestic violence to the imagination. This in turn has evoked a very visceral reaction from many people. Previously, those who were calling for Roger Goodell to lose his job over his handling of this incident were minimal at best. Currently, these voices have grown so loud that Goodell has hired and independent firm to investigate the way the NFL has handled this issue. Furthermore, Goodell in recent weeks has openly admitted his egregious mistake with his original two game suspension of Rice and has also adapted new policies and procedures to address domestic violence in the NFL. Not only has the video incited the NFL and the Ravens into action it has also affected other teams as well. Where previously the Carolina Panthers had not given a second thought to playing Pro Bowl linebacker Greg Hardy (convicted of beating and threatening to kill his girlfriend), deactivated him for their week two matchup. I think Lyotard has rightly stated the important of the form of a text within a given context. This evident through looking at narrative stories through the various forms of texts and the reactions that they have elicited.

He elaborates on his notion of text in his work Discours, figure. Lyotard in this work notes that the nature of discourse has primarily been shaped by written text and the language used within a given text. However, he believes that there is another layer to every given form of text. There is a constitutive difference which is not to be read but to be seen (Lyotard 1971; p.9). It is this aspect of discourse that has continually been forgotten. In other words, for any form of discourse Lyotard wonders why it is only the language and the written of a text that perceived by most people. This brings us back to the Ray Rice domestic violence case. Prior to the release of the video written testimony of incident had already been revealed. We had heard from Ray Rice and various other outlets what had happened. However, despite this there was seemingly no consensus on how to view the situation. More importantly those who possessed the power to rectify the situation such as the Baltimore Ravens organization and Roger Goodell did not believe they had enough evidence to enforce a harsher punishment. They privileged the written discourse over the other figures and forms that tell this specific narrative of domestic violence. One could convincingly argue that the first video released along with Rice’s original apology (which did not include his wife) are sufficient forms of text to necessitate a harsher punishment of Rice’s actions than the two game suspension he received in July. The privileging of the discourse as written text is precisely what Lyotard argues against in his discussion of binary opposition in his work Discours, figure. Binary oppositions are the conflicts between figure and discourse.

In this sense discourse is used to describe written text and language while figure implies the various other forms that a text can have. All too often saying is privileged over seeing, reading over perceiving and universality over singularity. He stresses figure, form, and image in semiotic theories over language. It leaves one to question why there is such an emphasis on the written/ linguistic nature of discourse instead of the various forms that discourse can occur in. For the Ray Rice case it begs the question why must video evidence be necessary to truly begin to address the issue of domestic violence in the National Football League. Should not the other forms texts that tell this story also have substantial weight? In any case reflecting on the writing of Jean Francois Lyotard can provide a way to reflect on a myriad of socio-political issues including domestic violence and how we often fall into the trap of binary oppositions. Perhaps the texts we should start with is the stories of survivors and victims of domestic violence themselves, and allow their stories to transform our views and practices.

#VenusVs: Race & Meritocracy #NineForIX

 

Venus Williams playing World Team Tennis in Ma...

Venus Williams playing World Team Tennis in Mamaroneck, NY (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Last night, I watched Venus Vs, part of ESPN’s Nine for IX series (the IX is for title nine/women in sports). For about the last forty minutes, it became the story of how Venus Williams, Wimbledon champion of numerous times, fought to earn women equal pay at Wimbledon. I found the story intriguing back then as I do now, but I would like to reflect very briefly on the first 15 minutes. Venus’ presence in the late 90’s was unwelcome in the all white world of professional tennis. One of the more troubling events I will never forget was when Venus was penalized for one of her hair beads falling onto the court. I think this is a microcosm of the embedded racist belief systems in U.S. American culture. Venus was viewed as a monstrosity all because of her hair. Her dark skin + braided hair did not fit the beauty standards of liberal white supremacy, and so she had to be disciplined for it. The far more disturbing for me is the documentary’s commitment to meritocracy (which is a process of white liberal racism). The narrative turn for the story happens to go like this: Venus Williams faces racist microaggressions from tennis whiteys; Venus Williams wins a lot; Venus Williams overcomes racism. See a problem here? I do. Defending race-based meritocracy is still protecting racist institutions. The onus is on the part of the oppressed to prove that their looks, culture, bodily presence, and race is acceptable in the face of white supremacy. In short, race-based meritocracy blames the victims of racism for their plight without confronting the racist line judges and tennis players who Venus had to deal with.

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True Story: I Once Met Pat Summerall

Pat Summerall at the Legends of Charity Event

Pat Summerall at the Legends of Charity Event (Photo credit: CynthiaSmoot)

When I was in undergrad, I had the honor of meeting Pat Summerall at a Campus Crusade for Christ meeting. It was the only CRU meeting I attended I think, but it was well worth it. He seemed to be a genuine, humble Christian.  He will be missed. Some of my best moments during high school was watching football games with him and color commentator John Madden.

Enjoy your rest, Pat Summerall.

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