Tag Archives: Patristics

Patristics Carnival XXXIV: Easter Edition

Patristics Carnival XXXII

Happy Glorious Resurrection Day everyone! And what better way to celebrate Easter and our Risen Savior than the return of the ONLY blog carnival that highlights the Church Fathers and the apostolic tradition?

Miscellanies

Speaking of Easter, Bible Belt Catholic (Fr. James Melnick) shared a portion of an Easter homily by Athanasius of Alexandria.

Jim West pointed us to a book on Philip Melanchton’s reception of the Greek Fathers.

William Weedon (not to be confused with Joss Whedon!) shared some of his favorite quotes from John Chrystosom, Leo the Great, and St. Ambrose: here, here, here, and here.

Gabe Martini did a book review of On The Divine Liturgy (Popular Patristics Series)

Nathan A. Finn informed us of Southeastern Seminary’s new PhD program in Historical Theology, which will include researching the Church Fathers.

Tom and Dwayne hosted a guest post by Father Al on Open Theism and the Church Fathers’ commitment to God’s ineffability.

E Lawrence of Woman In Theology wrote a post on Teresa Of Avila and spirituality.

Father Antonio Kaldas posted part 7 and part 8 of his Being Orthodox series: Apostolic and Patristic and Connecting Past, Present and Future

Mike Skinner has aMaundy Thursday reflection with Cyril of Alexandria as well as a post on theological interpretation, Cyril and Luke 10:23-24.

A Patristic Explanation of the Symbolic Imagery of the Coming Judgement By His Eminence Metropolitan Hierotheos of Nafpaktos and Agiou Vlasiou

What Do You Know About The Gnostics?

This all started with Larry Hurtado making claims that the Gnostics were goofy heretics, not intellectuals. April DeConick made the case that the Gnostics weren’t really outliers of ancient thought, but serious thinkers. Larry Hurtado replied to her post. Phillip Tite add his viewpoint on the topic as a social historian. Adam Kotsko asked if we lost the term “Gnostic” to heretics because of anti-Marcionite struggles. Wayne Coppins also wrote a post on Gnostic teachers.

(Honestly, for what it’s worth, I am of the impression the term “Gnostic” was a fluid term, used for “mystic”: for more see Joel Watts‘s Praying in God’s Theater: Meditations on the Book of Revelation

What You Say About Jesus Having a Wife Now?

The New York Times tells us that the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife isn’t a fake, but really really old. April DeConick hopes that the fragment is a remain from a Valentinian Gnostic community. Katie asks why are people freaking out about all of this. Micael Grenholm asks why are people believing this document over the Gospels which are way older.

Other News and Notes of Interest:

In September of this year, St. Andrews’ Patristic Symposium will happen the 26th and 27th and the topic will be “From Alexandria to Cappadocia and Back Again”.

Elissa reflected on what it’s like to be called to do historical theology.

Charles A. Sullivan has revised Origen On The Dogma of Tongues.

Roger Pearse shares an account of the fall of the temple of Serapis in Alexandria

Joel Willits wants us to add The Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity to our personal libraries.

Divorce and Remarriage

Cardinal Walter Kasper gave a speech challenging the rules about denying Holy Communion to the divorced and remarried. Some responses included references to the Patristics such as the notion of Confession as a life raft. Father John Zuhlsdorf offered his insights.

On This Here Blog, from Yours Truly:

A few posts on Clement of Alexandria, his take on Romans 8, the Parable of the Shining Pearl, and Christus Victor Atonement in Clement’s theology. I also added a post on James Cone and the Church Fathers, and the first 2 of 3 posts on my Race-ing Towards Nicea series: Part 1 on the Incarnation, and Part 2 on Constantine and W.E.B. DuBois.

Well, that’s all for this Patristics Carnival; the next Patristics Carnival will be held on or around June 8th during the day of Pentecost and hosted by Jonathan.

And don’t forget Jonathan’s Ancient Languages Blog Carnival which has a deadline of April 30th.

Race-ing Toward Nicea part 2: Constantine, DuBois, & Lynching

                                                                                                                                    Whither, Eusebius of Caesarea?

For part one see: Race-ing Towards Nicea part 1: The Incarnation

I am continuing to wrestle with Peter Leithart’s Defending Constantine: The Twilight of an Empire and the Dawn of Christendom. Simultaneously I am working through James Cone’s The Cross and the Lynching Tree and today I would like to present a potential inter-textual reading of both works.

In Defending Constantine (Chapter 10 “Justice For All”), Peter Leithart goes through the nitty gritty details of Constantine’s views on justice as well as his executive decisions when it came creating laws. Among some of his peculiarities was Constantine’s contention, much like Liberation Theology, that justice must be served to the oppressed. In those days, the Roman court system was oppressive and heavily biased towards the rich and powerful. Some of Constantine’s laws worked against this. In addition, Constantine outlawed crucifixions. The theological imagination for the secular philosopher/emperor Constantine was attracted to Christianity, and in that move, ended a murderous practice. However, Constantine still kept capital punishment itself around; Leithart just notes that Constantine just found more “creative” ways of executing criminals.

Torture and gory body-policing activities sponsored by the state such as the cutting off of thieves’ hands were acceptable Constantinian practices. Back then, these were social norms. It was expected that Constantine not to be able to transcend his cultural milieu. Like the Christian realists of the mid-20th century and even today, Constantine achieved what they would consider a “proximate justice.” The death penalty was such the norm back then that Constantine joked with Arius that the Emperor considered Arius and his fellow dissidents to be “gallows rogues,” or persons who found ways, time and again from being hung from the gallows ala Mordecai in the Book of Esther.

One interesting move that Leithart makes (as part of his larger Dominionist agenda in looking at the theological & social conservativism of the Global South) is to point out the African context from which the Donatist and Arian cotnroversies arose. In both instances, Christian bishops INVITED Emperor Constantine to help resolve these disputes. In the case of the Donatists, property rights were at stake. Radical Libyan Christians who took an uncompromising stance against bishops and laity who gave in to Roman persecution by denying Jesus as their Savior to save their own hides. The conflicts were so intense that Donatists were sometimes murdered for their beliefs. Appealing to political powers that be (an outside third-party) seemed to be the realistic approach to these issues.

James Cone’s The Cross And The Lynching Tree is written at the intersections of atonement theory, theodicy, and the struggle against White Supremacy. As Cone is making his argument in favor of USian Christians looking at the Cross through the history of the lynching tree, he notes that it was poets and artists during the Harlem Renaissance that first made the connection. Jim and Jane Crow was institutional, legal white supremacy maintained by placing black bodies on the gallows. One such writer, novelist and Christian scholar was W.E.B. DuBois DuBois’ Christian anti-racist imagination enabled him to use theological imagery to work to dismantle White Supremacy. Lacing his Christian prayers with appeals to the Prince of Peace, commenting on the race riots started by White Supremacists by referring to the book of Psalms, DuBois lived as an example of liberating Christian orthopraxis.

A few years ago in seminary, a group of African American students (including myself) protested against the injustices done to the Jena Six. The Jena Six situation was a high school fight started because someone hung a noose around the tree where the white kids usually sit. Under the murderous threat from the history of imperialist, racist KKKristianity which includes Emperor Constantine who himself had threatened an African man (as a joke) with lynching, the black high schoolers had little choice but to STAND THEIR GROUND.

No one can do an honest assessment of the Nicene-Chalcedon tradition without acknowledging its enforcement through, at minimum, the threat of violence (i.e., the anathemas and damnations and exiles etc.).  However, the Nicene-Chalcedonian formulas are not beyond the liberating grasp of the Holy Spirit.  In fact, Nicea & Chalcedon & the Apostles’ Creeds are are important to the extent that they remind  us Gentile Christians of our metanarrative that we find in Scripture, and that our stories are not our own, and that THE story is not about us. Tradition (with a capitol T) ideally should be used to keep our nationalistic desires in check, but when it fails to do so, history and Scripture witnesses to the fact that God uses outsiders, the rejects to prophesy deliverance to the Body of Christ.

No one represents this moreso than the the U.S. American prophet W.E.B. DuBois.  Living in the 20th century context where white Christians could recite the Creeds by rote memory, and then in the very next breathe, call a black person n*gger before lynching her, W.E.B. Dubois embodied Nicene-Chalcedonian orthopraxis as a testimony to Jesus Christ Our LORD and Liberator. In his essay, “The Gospel According To Mary Brown,” Dubois writes the Gospel narratives for his time, with a mulatto man portraying Jesus. Joshua is lynched because of his message of peace and anti-White Supremacy. As his mother Mary is found weeping, Joshua appeared to her, with his hair shining, white clothes (biblical language for holiness of the martyrs), “for his voice was the Voice of God.” When Mary asked where did Joshua go, Joshua tells her, “I was crucified, dead, and buried. I descended into Hell. On the third day, I rose from the dead. I ascended into Heaven and sit on the right hand of my Father, from whence I shall come to judge the Quick and the Dead.”

In an earlier post, I was mistaken to suggest that Constantine and Athanasius represent two different kinds of Christianity. It would be better for me to have said that Eusebius of Caesarea and the bishops and presbyters that made room for the devil by inviting Constantine to the table represent the imperial version of Christianity, the one where the nation-states’ story matters more than the Resurrection itself.

Eusebius and Athanasius represent two types of Christianity that we all have to struggle with. Eusebius and the Christian empire/dominionist tradition that Leithart favors is obsessed maintaining power over others (coercion, violence, war, white supremacy, lynching). The Nicene-Chalcedonian orthopraxis of Clement & Athansius of Alexandria and W.E.B DuBois offers a different way of being & doing in the world, that of living on the margins of exile, and pointing to the Logos as our Teacher & Prince of peace.

Other posts of interests:

Nestorianism Returns: Tea Party Politics vs Hypostatic Unity

Book Review: W.E.B. DuBois: American Prophet

Emperor Constantine and the Conservative Case for Reparations

Updated Calendar For The Patristic Carnival for 2014

Patristics Carnival XXXII

April 20th- Easter Hosted by me

June 8th- Pentecost hosted by Jonathan

Either: September 3rd- Gregory The Great or September 13th- John Chrysostom: Hosted by Me

Either: November 1st- All Saints or November 23rd- Christ The King / Clement of Alexandria Feast Day [Western Calendar] Hosted by Mike Skinner

December 25th- Christmas Hosted by me

If there is a Feast Day or Holy Day that fits in between these dates (does not have to be part of the Western Liturgical calendar), and you would like to host the Patristics Carnival, let me know.

In this carnival, posts on historical theology prior to the Catholic and Protestant Reformations, articles on these topics, new developments and news, book reviews will all be eligible for this carnival.

To submit nominations for the carnival, place a comment on this post (the call for submissions), email the carnival at PATRISTICSCARNIVAL [A] HOTMAIL.COM, or send a message to the Political Jesus Facebook Page. You can even do a submission for this carnival on the PJ Tumblr: Just fill out, submit with your name and/or pseudonym here: PJ Tumblr Suggestion Box

The deadline for submissions is April 19th, 2014 at 11:59pm.