Tag Archives: Christian universalist

Christian Universalism: Hegemony Divinized

A Possible Interpretation

Hegemony: “the social, cultural, ideological, or economic influence exerted by a dominant group”

Joel continues his proud posts on universalism and how God is love and if God love everyone (blah blah blah) God will save everyone (yada yada).  For the record, I do not consider universalism to be a heresy; just a misreading of Christian tradition, Scripture, and a habitual tendency to separate God’s love from God’s justice.  But as a theologian who is dedicated to justice, I do not see a reason why universalism is protected from a just critique.  So, here is my theory:

In universalism, God super-imposes HIS (yes, his, because universalism as a see it favors the very phallocentric, Enlightenment perspective of a universal destiny) love on all of humanity, even those who continue to reject God, or a higher power/the big  Transcendent in general.  Never one have I heard universalists talk about justice since it is sort of a shibboleth when it comes to discussing the end times for them. To believe that everyone, in the end, will wind up in the same place really means this: they will all have to, by necessity, either make the same religious choices as I argued in my Fanon and universalism piece or that it is by God’s predetermination from the beginning that everyone is “saved and sanctified.” Universalism is predestination with a smile on its face.

It is my belief that Christianity is at its best when it works as both a counter-hegemonic force as well as a community that seeks to transcend the counter-hegemonic/hegemonic divide.  For more on my views, see here.

P.S.: I understand that there are some Christians on the biblioblogosphere who see hegemony as a good thing, and that’s okay, too. Just know, God still loves you.

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Universalist: I am not one. Period.

So, I noticed that there has been a few bloggers who twist my positions on theological issues from time to time and so I will not give them the time to answer their false accusations, but I just wanted to clarify what I said about the afterlife so there will not be any errors or so I will not have to post about it again, since it is just a waste of time, and there are more pertinent issues to blog about:

I am not a Universalist or a Religious pluralist. I find both positions disgusting and imperialist all at the same time.  I do not believe that God forces people who do not love God to love God in the end.  It is God’s choice, and design, to raise up people who believe in the Son from the dead into the new heaven and new Earth.  Our souls/spirits/minds do not leave our bodies; we rest, and then we rise again, either to joy or despair.  Humans choose to go to hell because it is their choice; God will freely choose not to “save” everyone because there are those who will not love God because they do not want to.  God will not force people who rejected God to love God back, since it will not be mutual.  God is love and loves everyone, but not everyone chooses to show love back.   I am not a calvinist or a universalist, as I have mentioned before.  On universalism, I end with a quote by Black Puritan preacher Lemuel Haynes:

“To suppose Satan or any other being aims at universal holiness and happiness by encouraging men in sin or disobedience, is highly preposterous.” (Sketches of the life and character of Reverend Lemuel Haynes by Timothy Cooley, 1839; page 109).

In other words, if the whole world is saved, there would be no reason why sin and evil exist in the world still. With universal salvation must come universal sanctification, and that has not happened.

Truth and Peace,

Rod