Tag Archives: bad business practices

Sunday Funnies: The Heart of Worship, A Wal-Mart Parody

My inspiration for this week’s Sunday Funnies comes from the South Park episode, Find The Heart (of wal-mart of course) as well as that recent ruling by the Supreme Court on it’s gender discrimination case.

“When the pavement fades,
And all is stripped away,
And you simply come,
Longing just to bring
Something that’s of worth
That will bless our heart

I’ll bring things in for a refund
For a receipt in itself
Is more than you have required
Your smile is bigger than any grin
That’s the way you want it to appear
You’re looking into my heart

I’m coming back to the heart of Wal-Mart
And it’s all about you, and it’s all about you (PURCHASE!)
I’m sorry for the layaway I never paid it
When it’s all about you,
All about you (Purchase!)

Sales of endless worth,
Glad you take American Express
So the community you can serve
Though I’m weak and poor
All I have is yours
Every single breathe

I’ll bring things in for a refund
For a receipt in itself
Is more than you have required
Your smile is bigger than any grin
That’s the way you want it to appear
You’re looking into my heart

I’m coming back to the heart of Wal-Mart
And it’s all about you, and it’s all about you (PURCHASE!)
I’m sorry for the layaway I never paid it
When it’s all about you,
All about you (Purchase!)

It’s all about you, (Purchase!)”

The Economy of Jesus: An Introduction

A few weeks ago in the theo-blogosphere there were several concerned theo-bloggers who expressed questions about the Tea Party’s rise to political power after the mid-term elections, particularly their approach to economics: see for example, J Kameron Carter, Adam Kotsko, and David Horstkoetter.

As I promised via Twitter, I want to start exploring the ancient life of Israel & Judah, Christ, and their  relationship to economic practices, particularly here in the United States. I want it to be an exploration in Christology rather than a partisan polemic, which seeks not some abstract fascist leaning Third Way , but that which is guided by some principles, perhaps the Ten Commandments for example, or maybe notions of Christian nonviolence. Perhaps we should try to re-imagine the world without monetary policy or currency? Are they really necessary? Are these inherently violent? Maybe we should consider bringing back bartering, trading possessions between individuals and families?

I object to labelling Jesus of Nazareth either a Socialist or capitalist, due in large part to my suspicion that so many Western intellectuals have a bad habit of viewing, as J Kameron Carter in his work Race: A Theological Account, Jesus as the very best that the West had to offer in the garb of the Orient.¬† That, and the tendency I see on some on the left and right of encapsulating Christ as the embodiment of their ideals at the direct (whether it be conscious or unconscious remains to be seen) exclusion of Jesus’ Jewishness. By this, I mean not to delve into which sect he was part of ( Second-Temple Pharisee or revolutionary Essene, etc.) but the (economic and religious) practices which formed his identity and his earthly ministry.

I hope that you will join me in this journey.

Truth and Peace,

Rod

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Sweet Sweet Victory: Common Decency Does Amazon.Com In

In a stunning development that I just discovered through Twitter, AMAZON.COM has taken down that abomination of a publication.

Ah, Super Joel’s campaign worked, and that’s why he is a super-hero among us mortal biblio-bloggers.

Dun dun dun, dun dun dun!

Cue the Superman Theme Song!